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What on Earth is Going on? is a podcast for the curious, where small talk is banned and tangents are prized. Strap yourself in for genuine dialogues with people who think deeply and are ready to tackle the big questions, such as broadcaster Terry O'Reilly, economist Miles Corak and journalist Jessica Vomiero.

Join Ben Charland to peel back the headlines and ask, what are the forces, people and ideas that shape the human story today? Have things always been this nuts, or are they getting crazier by the day? From the Mafia to the Beavertonwomen in politics to women in leadershiphistory to artificial intelligence, and entrepreneurship in the digital age to the art of wheelchair fencing, just what on Earth is going on?

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Jun 22, 2018

There is a pressing need to rethink how we produce, consume and transmit energy, to diversify our energy sources, and to reorder our daily lives as well as the larger structures of our economies. These shifts, whether in the form of self-driving cars or backyard geothermal plants, are coming regardless of climate change – they’re happening naturally. But such changes are not just about convenience and leisure. They may transform the way we conceive of our ecology, our society, and our place within it.

Ben chats with forester, geographer and public policy professor Warren Mabee.

Read the blog post for this episode.

About the Guest

Dr. Warren Mabee is, in his own words, a forester who somehow became a geographer. He is a professor and head of the department of geography and planning, as well as a professor of policy studies, at Queen’s University in Kingston. He is a Canada Research Chair in Renewable Energy Development and Implementation as well as the Director of the Queen’s Institute for Energy and Environmental Policy. His research focuses on the interface between renewable energy policy and technologies, with particular emphasis on wood energy and biofuels.

Learn more about Warren.